Why 41% of Men Cry After Sex: New Research Explains What’s Postcoital Dysphoria Following Your Orgasm

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Remember the movie ‘How to lose a guy in 10 days’ were a too emotional friend of Andie Anderson was an example of how to lose a boyfriend? Then you must remember how awkward it was to see her crying right after the sex. Actually, that’s not so rare thing, scientists now say. Moreover, even men experience such reactions after orgasm.

What’s even more surprising, turns out men experience Postcoital Dysphoria (a wave of negative emotions after sex) at rates comparable to women, according to new research from Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

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Source: Heightline

What’s Postcoital Dysphoria?

Postcoital Dysphoria (PCD) is a condition characterized by a short-term period of counter-intuitive responses after consensual sex, involving inexplicable feelings of irritability, sadness, anxiety, or tearfulness.

In one female study, the feeling of PCD was described as “feeling hollow”, “homesickness”, or a “yearning for something that was missing”.

Studies of PCD in women have shown that up to 46.2% of women have experienced PCD in their lifetime.

However, there was no much information about the men’s experience as they may have been relatively ignored in the PCD literature because of societal expectations, according to Professor Robert Schweitzer, a psychology researcher from QUT, who co-authored the paper with masters student Joel Maczkowiack.

“My guess is that we have such a cultural view of what sex is for men that the very idea of men having experiences which are aversive are just not even considered,” said professor Robert Schweitzer, a psychology researcher from QUT, who co-authored the paper with masters student Joel Maczkowiack.

Surprising results

Source: Giphy

The QUT study involved an international online survey of over 1,200 men and found that 41% of men reported experiencing PCD in their lifetime. The study also found that 3 to 4% of men experience PCD on a regular basis.

For these chronic sufferers of PCD, these adverse emotional reactions can significantly affect sexual enjoyment.

“It is because I cannot bear negative feelings and emotions anymore,” a 41-year-old participant in the QUT study said. “I am avoiding any sexual behaviour as much as possible, despite still feeling needs.”

In women, PCD has shown modest associations with childhood sexual abuse as well as general psychological distress, although the melancholy experienced during the refractory period has been found to be mostly unrelated to other forms of emotional distress in life because of its short-lived, inexplicable nature).

In the QUT study, psychological distress was found to be strongly associated with male experiences of PCD and childhood sexual abuse showed a small association.

However, Schweitzer doesn’t believe that these results were statistically significant enough to comment on.

“It is very, very small in our sample … it’s really just a few percentage points,” he said.


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Summary
What's Postcoital Dysphoria that Make Us Fell Hollow Following Orgasm or Why 41% of Men Get Sad And Cry After Sex - New Research Explains
Title
What's Postcoital Dysphoria that Make Us Fell Hollow Following Orgasm or Why 41% of Men Get Sad And Cry After Sex - New Research Explains
Description
Remember the movie 'How to lose a guy in 10 days' were a too emotional friend of Andie Anderson was an example of how to lose a boyfriend? Then you must remember how awkward it was to see her crying right after the sex. Actually, that's not so rare thing, scientists now say. Moreover, even men experience such reactions after orgasm. What's even more surprising, turns out men experience Postcoital Dysphoria (a wave of negative emotions after sex) at rates comparable to women, according to new research from Queensland University of Technology (QUT).
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