What’s “Snapchat Dysmorphia”? 55% of Plastic Surgeons’ Patients Want to Look Better For Selfies Due to Instagram and Snapchat Filters

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Selfies and face filters have changed the way we see ourselves and some doctors are concerned this could be a huge problem.

Keep on reading Nexter.org to know more.

‘Want to look like on my selfies’

instagram-snapchat-selfie-photo

Source: Instagram

We all use  or Instagram filters that can add puppy ears and a flower crown to your head as well as make your eyes appear larger, chin smaller, and nose narrower.

However, some doctors are worried that filters, and social media in general, are creating pressure to look perfect and this might be harmful — particularly for teens and young adults, Buzzfeed reports.

Social media is stoking a rise in surgery requests by younger people, and face-altering apps and filters are creating unrealistic expectations for the results of these procedures.

“Society, with all the social media, is much more image-focused. … You see it with all types of social media platforms,” Dr. Neelam Vashi, director of the Boston University Cosmetic and Laser Center, told BuzzFeed News.

Different photo-editing filters and apps offer a degree of image control that was previously available only to celebrities or models, and they have altered beauty standards, according to an opinion piece Vashi and her colleagues published this month in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

They say selfies and filters could worsen symptoms for people who have been diagnosed with or are at risk for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or an excessive preoccupation with one or more perceived flaws in appearance.

instagram-snapchat-selfie-photo

Source: Getty Images

What is “ dysmorphia”?

One British cosmetic surgeon Tijion Esho provided a new term “ dysmorphia” earlier this year to describe the rise in patients who wanted plastic surgery to mimic their filtered selfies.

But this isn’t a recognized medical diagnosis, and so far, there is no real data showing a link between filters or image-altering apps and a rise in BDD diagnoses.

However, a 2017 survey by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) claims more people who are considering cosmetic or surgical procedures say that looking better in selfies is one of the reasons. It found that 55% of surgeons reported seeing patients who wanted to alter their appearance to improve selfies, up from 42% in 2016.

instagram-snapchat-selfie-photo

Source: Instagram

filters are not causing plastic surgery, and dysmorphia is not BDD, but it could be a trigger and this [article] is just increasing awareness,” Vashi said. “The filters create an instantaneous change or improvement in looks … so patients want to go to their doctor and get instantaneous enhancement. … To what extent is that feasible or appropriate?”.


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What's "Snapchat Dysmorphia"? 55% of Plastic Surgeons' Patients Wanted Look Better For Selfies Due to Instagram and Snapchat Filters
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What's " Dysmorphia"? 55% of Plastic Surgeons' Patients Wanted Look Better For Selfies Due to Instagram and Filters
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Selfies and face filters have changed the way we see ourselves and some doctors are concerned this could be a huge problem.
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