Southwest Airlines Horrible Incident: Pilot Praised for Her ‘Nerves of Steel’ and Safe Landing – Shocking Photos and Videos (UPD)

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The horrible incident happened Tuesday with Southwest Airlines flight that was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia after part of its engine broke off and shattered a passenger window.

Stay with Nexter.org to know more.

Updated April 19:

Tammie Jo Shults, a veteran Navy pilot, who captained Flight 1380 flew on with one engine, displaying what one passenger would later call “nerves of steel.”

A pilot who safely landed a Southwest Airlines passenger plane has been praised as an “American hero” by survivors.

Source: CNN

Passengers told CNN affiliate WPVI that the pilot walked through the aisle and talked with them to make sure they were all right.

Passenger Alfred Tumlinson told WPVI: “She has nerves of steel. That lady, I applaud her. I’m going to send her a Christmas card, I’m going to tell you that, with a gift certificate for getting me on the ground. She was awesome.”

A cause has yet to be determined, but officials said an early review of the incident found evidence of metal fatigue where a fan blade had broken off, according to the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

flight-3d-photo

Source: 3D Molier. Diagram is schematic. Pointers indicate approximate areas where passengers were sitting.
By Anjali Singhvi, Sahil Chinoy and Yuliya Parshina-Kottas/The New York Times

In a nutshell  

The Southwest Airlines jet was on a flight from New York to Dallas with 149 people aboard on Tuesday, April 17.

After 20 minutes of the flight suddenly the sound of explosions boomed from the left side of the plane.

It turned out that Boeing 737-700 suffered an uncontained engine failure and had to make an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport.

“I heard a loud boom and about five seconds later, all the oxygen masks deployed,” passenger Marty Martinez said. “I immediately knew something was wrong. It just didn’t register what could have been.”

Something in the engine broke apart midair and burst through the window, passengers said. The National Transportation Safety Board has confirmed one person died and seven other passengers were injured.

The passenger has been identified as Jennifer Riordan, a vice president of community relations for Wells Fargo bank, according to the Associated Press.

Several passengers had to pull her back into the plane when she was sucked out of the shattered window. She died at a Philadelphia hospital after the plane made an emergency landing, authorities said.

In a statement, Wells Fargo called her “a well-known leader who was loved and respected.” She is survived by two children and her husband, Michael Riordan, who was once the chief operating officer for the City of Albuquerque, KOAT reported.

plane-passanger-pics

Source: AP

Video and audio from the plane

Here’s audio of the call between the Southwest Airlines 1380 pilot and air traffic control, edited for length and clarity. The audio was downloaded from LiveATC.net. The pilot stays remarkably calm throughout the harrowing incident.

In one of the most bizarre parts of the clip, the pilot explains that someone “went out” of a hole in the plane around 3:52.

People also shared their videos from the plane and even streamed video on Facebook.

Gepostet von Marty Martinez am Dienstag, 17. April 2018

Gepostet von Marty Martinez am Dienstag, 17. April 2018

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Southwest Jet Engine Failure: Woman Died After Almost Sucked Out a Window - Shocking Photos and Videos
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Southwest Jet Engine Failure: Woman Died After Almost Sucked Out a Window - Shocking Photos and Videos
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The horrible incident happened Tuesday with Southwest Airlines flight that was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia after part of its engine broke off and shattered a passenger window. Stay with Nexter.org to know more.
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