‘Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle’ – Do We Need One More Jungle Book Story Made by Netflix? (Review)

142

New Netflix’s movie “Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle” arrives in theaters on Nov. 29 and begins streaming on Netflix on Dec. 7. Nexter.org prepared a of the upcoming premiere and explains what to expect from Andy Serkis’s version of the legendary story. 

Mowgli is in the center of the story

The film, based on Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli stories, puts the young boy (played by Rohan Chand) front and center. Raised by wolves, as well as a well-meaning bear and black panther, Mowgli is wild as can be, but struggles to gain the acceptance of the pack; no amount of training can obscure the fact that he’s still human.

Then there’s the matter of Bengal tiger Shere Khan (Benedict Cumberbatch), who killed Mowgli’s mother and has it out for the kid, too, endangering the pack by association.

Darker version

Source: Netflix

Though, as in Disney’s adaptations of The Jungle Book, the animals speak and cooperate with each other, the tone of Mowgli hews a little starker. That isn’t to say that this is a “dark and gritty” read on the material; rather, it’s still a fairytale, but one clearly conscious of its roots in British Imperialism in India.

Stars

Source: Netflix

The story aside, the film is also beautifully acted, featuring terrific vocal performances from the likes of Christian Bale, Naomie Harris, Eddie Marsan, Tom Hollander, and Serkis himself. However, their motion capture performances are rendered almost irrelevant by CGI that hinders more than helps, which comes as a surprise given Serkis’ status as the reigning god of mocap.

Awful animations

Source: Netflix

There’s something uncanny — and not in a good way — about the faces of the animals; the impression they give off is of animal skulls molded to look more human, with curiously dead eyes then superimposed onto the skin. It doesn’t particularly help that the film favors a realistic visual approach, in which the skin and scars on the animals reinforces a grotesqueness that extends even to the animals that are meant to be cute.

Given how much time Mowgli spends with the animals, the style (or lack thereof) of the animation is a misfire that nearly topples the entire film.

PG-13 film

Source: Netflix

Mowgli is also decidedly a PG-13 film and may not be suitable for children under the age of 10. The Jungle Book had its scary scenes and Shere Khan is a malevolent presence in both, but violence and death are a much more palpable part of the world that Serkis presents. If any film that basically spends most of its time with talking CG animals can be described as “gritty” and “realistic,” the director has certainly done his best to make that picture.


MORE HOT NEWS

Summary
'Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle' -  Do We Need One More Jungle Book Story Made by Netflix? (Review)
Article Name
'Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle' - Do We Need One More Jungle Book Story Made by Netflix? ()
Description
New Netflix's movie "Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle" arrives in theaters on Nov. 29 and begins streaming on Netflix on Dec. 7. Nexter.org prepared a of the upcoming premiere and explains what to expect from Andy Serkis's version of the legendary story. 
Nexter.org
Nexter.org
nexter.org
  Subscribe  
Notify of

More News from Nexter