Missouri Schools vs North Carolina Ones: How Much US Sex Education Is Enough?

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Feels like sex education is still the hot topic nationwide. Or its amount and quality, to be specific. #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have caused quite a stir in public conscience.

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Source: Reddit

And parents are getting seriously concerned their kids are learning more from the media space than from the school books.

However, this doesn’t exactly match the reality. Missouri has announced expanding its sex ed curriculum to include sexual consent and violence discussions.

On the contrary, parents in North Carolina are worried 6th graders are getting way too much knowledge beyond their years. What’s wrong with this picture?

Why Missouri Wants More Sex Ed?

In Missouri, the House Bill 2234 received support from the members of The House Children and Families Committee.

The Bill “requires course materials and instruction” on human sexuality and STD’s to include the information about sexual harassment, violence, and consent. Here are the key takeaways:

  • The recommended form of sexual behaviour for unmarried pupils is abstinence because it’s 100% effective in pregnancy prevention, STD’s, and emotional trauma.
  • The sex ed course has to emphasize the hazards and regretful consequences of STD’s. Students are to be provided with more information on exposure to HIV/AIDS, HPV (human papilloma virus), and hepatitis.  
  • Students are to be presented with the latest fact-based information on side effects and health benefits of contraception, as well as contraception failure rates.
  • Students are to be educated about the dangers of sexual predators, consequences of inappropriate text messaging (“sexting”), safe and responsible online behaviour.
  • And finally, students are to be taught about sexual harassment, sexual violence, and consent.

One of the reasons for making amendments to the bill is sexual perpetrators on university campuses. Teaching high school students about sexual consent as well as having an open dialogue with adults is necessary to prevent new instances of sexual abuse.

The shocking statistic on sexual violence presented by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center demonstrates that over 90% of campus sexual assault victims don’t report the assault.

Fits of Puritanism: Why North Carolina Doesn’t Want Get Real?

The Cumberland County Board of Education in North Carolina voted to get rid of Planned Parenthood’s “Get Real” sexual education program in middle schools.

The “Get Real” course is taught in 31 US states and covers over 221,000 students.

After the educational initiative had been slammed by parents who were appalled by the sex ed curriculum. Over 1,800 people have signed the online petition to prohibit the course.

According to the parents’ claims, “Get Real” encourages 6th graders to engage in sexual practices they are not ready for. Reportedly, the workbooks provide flash cards demonstrating the proper condom usage, for “vaginal, oral or anal sex.”

Also, the course recommends using “non-microwavable saran wrap” as a preventive measure for sex acts that do not involve penetration.

Most parents in North Carolina considered the knowledge provided to their kids way too premature. Still, not everyone is so radically opposed to the “descriptive” program.

Some parents believe it’s better if their kids are taught about safe sex practices at school, because not every child is comfortable talking about that with their parents.   

In response to criticism, Jen Slonaker, a creator of “Get Real”, claims the primary objective of the course is to delay sex.

The sex ed program is meant to teach kids about pregnancy and effective STI prevention. After “Get Real” is revoked, schools will teach the former sex education program.

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Missouri Schools vs North Carolina Ones: How Much US Sex Education Is Enough?
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Missouri Schools vs North Carolina Ones: How Much US Sex Education Is Enough?
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Feels like sex education is still the hot topic nationwide. Or its amount and quality, to be specific. #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have caused quite a stir in public conscience.
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