Generation of Future or Gender ‘X’: Japan’s ‘Genderless’ Subculture, Indian Hijras and More

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The world’s perception of identity is changing rapidly, that’s why such phenomenon as “genderless” became popular in some corners of the globe. See that and other times when the common understanding of gender and identity shifted and changed into something brand new. 

Follow Nexter.org to know more.

’s ‘genderless’ subculture

Source: Getty

The Japanese call this subculture jendaresu-kei, which means genderless style. The idea is that a large number of Japanese men self-identify as “genderless” and add to their life some of the aspects of life that are mostly associated with women.

It concerns Tokyo’s fashionable district – Harajuku. For example, you can see there a celebrity model Ryuchell that doesn’t think that using cosmetics and dressing as a woman is gay or transgender.

Source: Instagram/ryuzi33world929

For the representatives of this subculture, a male body shouldn’t be associated with stereotypical manly appearance.

You might think that it’s something new for Japanese conservative culture, however, this kind of cross-dressing was popular throughout the history of the country – feminine males and masculine females are quite common in Japanese novels and theaters.

Ikumen 

ikumen-japanese-fathers-pic

Source: KYODO

The word “ikumen” that literally means “child-rearing men” refers to men that break with common rules of suit masculinity by insisting on spending more time at home with their children.

This kind of men appeared because of Fathering , a non-profit organization that inspires men to take an active role in their children’s education and life.

Guna Yala with third gender people

Source: Paul Stewart

Guna Yala, aka San Blas, is an indigenous province in northeast Panama. Guna Yala is homeplace to the indigenous people known as the Gunas.

In fact, 49 of 300 islands of Panama’s eastern coast are inhabited by the indigenous Guna people. Guna Yala also is an autonomous territory and has its own flag with a left-facing swastika referring to the four directions of the world.

Except for what is mentioned before, Guna Yala is unique in its nature, resulting in the tolerant gender equality or even gender fluidity.

Egle Gerulaityte met a girl named Liza that showed her. Liza looks like other Guna women, except for the fact that she was actually born as a boy.

“My mother taught me how to make these beautiful molas, our traditional embroidered clothes,” Lisa said, showing her work to Egle Gerulaityte. “Some of these represent birds and animals, but some are very powerful – they will protect you from evil spirits,” she added.

Hijras 

Source: Getty

Hijras (translated to English as “eunuch” or “hermaphrodite”)are officially recognized as the third gender in the Indian subcontinent, that are not male or female, but a gender ‘X’. Hijras have a recorded history in the Indian subcontinent from antiquity (Kama Sutra period).

Commonly, hijras live in the special communities that are governed by a guru.

During the regular census in India, the Hijras demanded that they were recognized as the third sex, refusing to register as “men” or “women.” In June 2001, the National Congress of the Hijras was convened in the city of Rath, which declared political aspirations at the local, regional and general Indian level.

In April 2014, the Indian Supreme Court officially recognized the Hijra and transgender people as the third sex.

 


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Generation of Future or Gender 'X': Japan's 'Genderless' Subculture, Indian Hijras and More
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Generation of Future or Gender 'X': 's 'Genderless' Subculture, Indian Hijras and More
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The world's perception of identity is changing rapidly, that's why such phenomenon as "genderless" became popular in some corners of the globe. See that and other times when the common understanding of gender and identity shifted and changed into something brand new.  Follow Nexter.org to know more. 
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