BUSTED: “Having HPV As a Man is No Big Deal” + 6 Other Most Common Myths About Sex

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There are a lot of myths about and education in the classroom still doesn’t answer many questions. Lucinda Holt, a sexual education advocate with the educational organizations Answer and Amaze, is ready to help anyone who is confused.

And we, at Nexter.org, selected the most interesting Q&A for you.

Men and women have “sexual peaks” at different ages

NO, THEY DO NOT

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Source: Medium

Basically, a “peak”, according to researchers, is the time during which a person has the highest levels of hormones in his/her body. Yes, levels of hormones change with puberty and age, but major events like pregnancy or experiences like life stressors can change it as well. So, the whole idea of a “peak” is pretty unsustainable.

“A sexual peak is a bit absurd on the face of it because everyone’s experiences are so unique,” Johnsen said. “People experience pleasure in ways that are not necessarily tied to orgasms. The notion that you would tie those numbers to a sexual peak almost sets people up for disappointment.”

Teenagers are rabid monsters

NO, THEY ARE NOT

Source: Giphy

Yes, teens may have higher hormone levels than older people but this totally doesn’t mean that teenagers just can’t keep it in their pants because of this.

Thornhill, educator and advocate said: “Teens may have an arousal response that is higher than other stages than life, but arousal is not necessarily the same thing as desire. And just because someone is sexually aroused, it doesn’t mean they want to have with another person. It just means they’re responsive to stimuli. There’s an interest in , but it’s not this uncontrollable animalistic urge that cannot be tamed and controlled.”

Hormonal birth control is bad for you

NO, IT IS NOT

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Source: ScienceAlert

Johnsen said: “The pill is one of the most studied medicines of all time. People should choose their birth control based on what they’re comfortable with. Regarding the idea that using hormonal birth control continuously to skip your period is dangerous, there is a large body of medical research that shows for most people, it’s a perfectly safe and effective way to prevent pregnancy.”

Birth control is a personal choice of any woman. Here are some most common myths and concerns about hormonal birth control:

  • It will be harder to get pregnant after you stop using it: There is no evidence of that. Once you stop taking the pill your body will resume a non-hormonally regulated cycle.
  • It causes weight gain: There is no evidence that. Moreover, there are some people reported quite the opposite – weight loss.
  • A hormonally regulated cycle is worse than a natural cycle: There is no scientifically proven negative consequence to regulating your period and this is just your personal choice.

Having HPV as a man is no big deal

NO, IT IS A BIG DEAL

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Source: rockymountainkid

Basically, there is no cure for HPV and there is no way to test for it in men. Yes, there are some preventative vaccines for harmful iterations of the virus, but a person’s immune system is the one responsible for suppressing the virus.

So, if a man thinks that he may have HPV, he should tell his partner about it, as this virus is sexually transmitted and can cause cancer.

There’s no male birth control

YES, THERE IS

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Source: Capital FM

Yes, boys and girls, a male pill is not in the game yet. But why are you forgetting about your good old friend – condom? It still works perfectly.

Condoms aren’t effective

YES, THEY ARE

Myths-About-Sex-BUSTED-pic0

Source: Shape Magazine

In fact, there is 98 percent that condoms will effectively prevent pregnancy and also, protect you from STDs.

“We know that abstinence-only programs will often claim that condoms are not effective, or they will use an efficacy rate that’s lower than the actual efficacy rate,” Holt said. “When you do this, then young people think, why should i do this if it doesn’t even work. In fact, if used regularly and effectively, they prevent pregnancy and STI. And it’s the one thing that’s going to reduce your risk of an STI if you’re going to have .”

The ‘You can’t get pregnant “ifs”…

YES, YOU CAN…and sometimes can’t

Source: Maxim

“If a penis is in a vagina and ejaculates semen there, no matter where that happens, there’s a chance of pregnancy.”

The list of “ifs” is pretty big. Here are some popular ones:

  • NO, you cannot get pregnant if you swim in a pool or hot tub with some floating semen in it BUT you CAN get pregnant if you have in a jacuzzi or hot shower: chlorine, water, or heat does not work as neutralizers and they do not wash out sperm.
  • NO, you cannot get pregnant if you have oral . Swallow as much as you want, it won’t make you a baby.
  • YES, you can get pregnant if it’s your first time.
  • YES, it is possible to get pregnant from pre-cum, but very unlikely if a man doesn’t ejaculate inside the vagina.

That’s all folks! Keep yourselves safe and use condoms!


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BUSTED: “Having HPV As a Man is No Big Deal” And 6 Other Most Common Myths About Sex
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BUSTED: “Having HPV As a Man is No Big Deal” And 6 Other Most Common Myths About
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There are a lot of myths about and education in the classroom still doesn’t answer many questions. Lucinda Holt, a sexual education advocate with the educational organizations Answer and Amaze, is ready to help anyone who is confused.
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