‘Hawaii Jan.13’ and 3 More Fake Emergency Alerts that Scared People To Death

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Everybody makes mistakes, but when you’re an emergency system worker and “pushes the wrong button” the consequences could be terrible.

Nexter.org found most creepy cases of fake alerts that sparked panic.

Hawaii

Calm and blessing Saturday morning could become a real hell when you receive an emergency alert of an imminent missile attack.

The missile alarm that rocked Hawaii on Jan.13 turned to be a mistake by an employee at Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency (EMA) who “pushed the wrong button”.

Many people said they thought they were going to die.

Southern California

Sept. 23 in 2017 made Southern California panicked as the creepy message appeared on the screens of cable television.

The interruption came at just after 11 a.m. in the form of an onscreen emergency alert followed by a voice.

“Realize this: extremely violent times will come,” a male voice said.

“I was definitely startled, because the volume increased exponentially,” said Diamond Bar resident Erin Mireles, who was watching Spectrum Cable when her show was interrupted. “I wasn’t alarmed in the sense of thinking something was wrong, because I assumed it was some sort of hack. My channel changed back to Bravo after a couple minutes.”

According to Cox Cable spokesperson Joe Camero, the emergency broadcast happened during an emergency test being run across radio stations in the area.

Zombie apocalypse in Montana

The deadly attack or “zombie apocalypse” scared Montana in Feb. 2013 after hackers infiltrated the emergency broadcast system of local station KRTV in Great Falls.

Viewers were warned of a so-called zombie apocalypse and advised not to tangle with the monstrous creatures, the station said.

No images flashed across the screen during the hoax. But a male voice told viewers: “Civil authorities in your area have reported that the bodies of the dead are rising from the grave and attacking the living.” The voice warned not “to approach or apprehend these bodies as they are extremely dangerous.”

“We didn’t get any serious calls on it,” Great Falls Police Department spokesman Bill Hunter said.

zombies-montana-alert-fake-photo

Source: Reuters

Verizon

In December 2011 people in three New Jersey counties got an emergency alert message on phone saying, “Civil Emergency in this area until 1:24 PM EST Take Shelter Now U.S. Govern”.

The company warned of a “civil emergency” and told people to “take shelter now.” Trouble was, the message was a test, but it wasn’t labeled as such. Verizon later apologized.

verizon-emergency-alert-fake-photo

Source: NBC New York

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4 Fake Emergency Alerts That Scared People To Death
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4 Fake Emergency Alerts That Scared People To Death
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Everybody makes mistakes, but when you’re an emergency system worker and “pushes the wrong button” the consequences could be terrible. Nexter.org found most creepy cases of fake alerts that sparked panic.
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