3D Printed Guns: All You Need to Know About Ban for Blueprints in US + Explanation Why It’s Really Dangerous

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Federal judge temporarily blocked the release of blueprints for 3D-printed guns in US, only a day before they were supposed to be made public. 

Nexter.org reports all you need to know about the 3D printed weapon so far.

3d-printed-guns-pics

Source: Getty Images

DIY weapon

Those are the times we live in.

A gun rights group Defense Distributed that has posted plans for 3D guns blocked downloads from its website on Tuesday after a US federal judge sided with states that argued the postings could help criminals and terrorists manufacture such weapons.

Defense Distributed reached a settlement with the U.S. State Department last month which would’ve allowed it to release blueprints for guns — including AR-15-like rifles — that could be downloaded and built with the help of 3D printers.

“This is a nationwide ban. … It takes us back to a period of time before the federal government flipped on their policy regarding these 3D ghost guns,” Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said.

“What it means is if anyone posts this information online, they are in violation of federal law and can suffer very serious consequences. So, it makes it unlawful to post that information and make it available to the public,” Ferguson said.

Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson said the site has disabled downloads until he reviews the order.

Although Defense Distributed had been expected to publish the blueprints on Wednesday, it uploaded files for nine types of gun to its website last week. Between Friday and Sunday, more than 1,000 people downloaded the files for building a gun apparently modeled on the AR-15 rifle – the gun used in many of America’s mass shootings.

3d-printed-gun-pic

Source: Youtube

Are 3D printed guns dangerous?

The 3-D printed guns are untraceable and no background checks are required so they’ve been called ‘ghost guns’. There are fears that known criminals could easily access them.

The first fully 3D-printed gun (save for the ammo), the Liberator, is capable of killing someone. Since then a number of other guns have sprung up on the web.

In late 2013 a gun enthusiast in Wisconsin showed off a working firearm called the Lulz Liberator, made from less than £15 ($25) worth of plastic, that could fire .38 calibre bullets without being damaged. In July, meanwhile, a Youtube user showed off ‘The Grizzly, a 3D-printed rifle capable of firing .22-calibre bullets.

These guns were one-shot only – the barrel had to be removed after each shot – but in August another gun enthusiast unveiled the Reprringer, capable of holding and firing five bullets.

Security experts also fear that the DIY guns could evade metal detectors used in public buildings and airports.

The high-end 3D printers needed to make such weapons cost thousands of dollars and may be too expensive for most people. But that doesn’t ease the concerns of those who think 3D printed guns are a bad idea.


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Summary
3D Printed Guns - Innovations or New Uncontrolled Threat? All You Need to Know About Ban for Blueprints + Explaination Why It's Really Dangerous
Title
3D Printed Guns - Innovations or New Uncontrolled Threat? All You Need to Know About Ban for Blueprints + Explaination Why It's Really Dangerous
Description
A federal judge temporarily blocked the release of blueprints for 3D-printed guns on Tuesday, only a day before they were supposed to be made public.  Nexter.org reports all you need to know about the 3D printed weapon so far.
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